Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Tumours (RFA)

Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Tumours

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive medical procedure used to treat certain types of liver tumours. It involves the use of radiofrequency energy to heat and destroy abnormal tissue in the liver.

What types of liver tumors can be treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA)?

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is commonly used to treat small liver tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is the most common type of primary liver cancer. It may also be used to manage secondary liver tumours such as metastasis from the colorectal primary.

Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Tumours

Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Tumours (RFA)
Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive medical procedure used to treat certain types of liver tumours. It involves the use of radiofrequency energy to heat and destroy abnormal tissue in the liver.

What types of liver tumors can be treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA)?

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is commonly used to treat small liver tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is the most common type of primary liver cancer. It may also be used to manage secondary liver tumours such as metastasis from the colorectal primary.

How does radiofrequency ablation work for liver tumors?

radiofrequency ablation - RFA
During RFA, a thin, specialized needle-like probe is inserted directly into the tumor through the skin, guided by imaging techniques such as ultrasound or CT scans. Radiofrequency energy is then delivered through the probe, generating heat that kills the cancerous or benign cells in the liver tumor.

How does radiofrequency ablation work for liver tumors?

During RFA, a thin, specialized needle-like probe is inserted directly into the tumor through the skin, guided by imaging techniques such as ultrasound or CT scans. Radiofrequency energy is then delivered through the probe, generating heat that kills the cancerous or benign cells in the liver tumor.
radiofrequency ablation - RFA

Is RFA a suitable treatment option for all liver tumor patients?

RFA is most effective for patients with small liver tumors, typically less than 3 centimetres in diameter. It is not suitable for larger tumors or tumors located near critical blood vessels, bile ducts, or other vital structures.
Advantages of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for liver tumors

What are the advantages of RFA for liver tumors?

Advantages of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for liver tumors
Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) offers several advantages, including minimal invasiveness, shorter recovery times, and a reduced risk of complications compared to traditional surgical methods. It is often chosen when surgery is not an option or poses higher risks.

What are the potential side effects or complications of RFA for liver tumors?

Common side effects of RFA may include pain or discomfort at the treatment site, fever, and fatigue. Serious complications are rare but can include infection, bleeding, injury to nearby organs, or damage to bile ducts. The rise in liver enzymes i.e. SGOT/SGPT is a common finding after the procedure.

How successful is RFA in treating liver tumors, and what is the long-term outlook?

The success of RFA in treating liver tumors depends on factors such as tumor size, location, and the overall health of the patient. When used appropriately for small tumors, RFA can provide excellent results. Some patients may remain tumour-free for years after treatment.

Are there alternative treatments to RFA for liver tumors?

transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)
liver transplantation
Yes, alternative treatments for liver tumors include surgical resection, liver transplantation, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), Microwave ablation and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI). The choice of radiofrequency ablation treatments depends on the patient’s specific condition and the tumor’s characteristics.

What is the recovery process like after RFA for liver tumors?

Recovery after Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is generally faster than after surgery. Most patients can return to their regular activities within a few days to a week. However, the exact recovery time varies from person to person, and your healthcare team will provide guidance on post-procedure care.

How people can determine if RFA for liver tumors is the right treatment option for someone or a loved one?

Determining the appropriate treatment for liver tumors, including RFA, requires a thorough evaluation by a medical specialist. Factors such as tumor size, location, overall health, need for transplant, waiting time for transplant and individual preferences will be considered in making the treatment decision. It’s essential to consult with a healthcare provider experienced in liver cancer management to discuss the best approach for a specific case.
Dr. Harsh J Shah